Virtualization Review: Why Myths Should Be Left To The Gods

January 5, 2011

Simon Rust, VP Technology, AppSense, has written a very interesting article as part of his series on Virtualization Review looking at some of the myths surrounding Desktop Virtualization and how in reality, when VDI is designed, implemented and managed correctly, these are in fact just myths and should not stop us from adopting desktop virtualization technologies.

In his article, Simon dispels the following 4 myths:

Myth 1: VDI is storage-heavy and therefore cost-heavy.

Myth 2: VDI is too hard.

Myth 3: Virtualization and the cloud are one and the same.

Myth 4: VDI is merely an extension of Server Based Computing (SBC).

You can read the article over on Virtualization Review here.

Hope you enjoy, and am keen to hear your thoughts.

Cheers

Gaz



Andrew Wood article from PubForum; AppSense User Rights Management & User Installed Applications

June 15, 2010

Following on from the recent PubForum event, Andrew Wood (Twitter @gilwood_cs) has published an interesting article over on The Virtualization Practice relating to some of the new functionality AppSense were demonstrating as part of our 2010 product release schedule.  The article discusses the possibilities and options with regards to ‘can you give power to users responsibly’ ?

At present, we are limited to providing either;
Administrator Accounts or Standard User Accounts
and
The ability to install everything or prevent the installation of anything

For many organizations and users this is not a viable option, certain users require access to controls and applications that require Admin credentials to access or change; however IT do not want users to have access to everything else available to an Administrative user.

Likewise, some users may require the ability to install their own business related applications, or more importantly have their user installed applications made available across desktop delivery mechanisms or persists between non-persistent virtual desktop sessions.

Both of these challenges will be address by AppSense in 2010 in the form of our USer Rights Management and also User Installed Application technologies; both of which were presented and demo’d at PubForum – of which Andrew has detail he thoughts on the use cases, pro’s and con’s of such a solution offering.

You can read his article in full here.

Further information on these technologies can be found here on the AppSense Community Blog:

NEW AppSense Functionality Being Demo’d At Citrix Synergy – “User Rights Management”

What is a user-installed application and why should we care?

User Installed Applications (UIA) by any other name?

Many thanks, and keen to hear your thoughts on our forthcoming products

Cheers

Gaz


AppSense (Martin Ingram) Article posted on ComputerWorld: Taming the Laptop

June 4, 2010

AppSense VP of Strategy Martin Ingram has written an article about mobile computing and the introduction of client hypervisors.  He examines the pro’s and con’s of the client side hypervisor, and the challenges we may be faced with as part of adoption and implementation…

The article can be read here

Thanks

Gaz



DV Adoption – It’s all about the user experience

February 12, 2010

I was reading recently a blog entry by Bruce Hoard over at the Virtualization Review.  Titled 2010: A watershed year for VDI, the article talks about the results of a survey of some 1500 IT execs about implementing desktop virtualization.  I think many people agree that 2010 will be the proof-year for VDI (65.7% of respondents in this case), but what was interesting about this survey was the degree to which respondents were highlighting user experience as critical to the success of their VDI roll-outs.  From “factors used to evaluate success of VDI projects” (83% said end “user experience”) to “likely obstacles to full scale VDI deploy” (answer…”user resistance to giving up existing desktops”) it seems evident that regardless of the business model and technologies you are planning to use for your VDI project, compromising the user experience in any way makes those considerations moot. 

So what composes the user experience?  Well, there’s performance for one….a slower desktop is bad news.  Mobility in HVD is another…..”what do you mean I can’t take my desktop home?”, and of course a predictable and personal working experience is another. 

Making the move from physical to virtual (or mixed) environments promises to bring increased flexibility, better business planning capabilities, and higher levels of productivity (oh and maybe reduced cost?!).  So why shouldn’t it not just create a similar user experience to the PC, but a better one?  With better network protocols, accessing devices, operating systems and applications, why shouldn’t the user experience improve with virtualization? 

We see customers who have implemented our user virtualization technology providing better experiences to their users – not just the same as the PC.  For example, a consistent personal desktop experience from anywhere at any time (“you mean my work and home PCs can have the same look and feel without me doing anything?”), the ability to still have a fully personalized VDI desktop when not on the company network, even the ability to take your ‘personality’ with you across geographic, OS, accessing device and contextual boundaries without it having to be tied to one monolithic desktop.  Since with user virtualization the personality is managed independent of the desktop, the underlying ‘corporate’ OS and apps are freshly provided every time access is required, hence they are always new, clean and up-to-date – no build up of trash! Nice! 

Combining user virtualization technology with improved protocols, accessing devices, OS’s, apps and delivery mechanisms is a proven ‘best practice’ approach to ensuring that this most important of considerations is nailed from day one.  Don’t implement VDI without it!

Pete Rawlinson, VP Marketing, AppSense